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DANIEL GORDON
Ratatouille and Smoke Bush (2014)
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Go see the spellbinding survey of Matisse’s cut-outs at MoMA, and then head down to Chelsea to check out the latest show by the artist Daniel Gordon, where his new series of phenomenally multilayered photographs take the calling cards of that great Modern master—decoupage, the fruited still life, vibrant Mediterranean colors—and reshuffle them for the digital age. Here’s what he does: he trawls the Internet for images of objects and then prints them out, fashions the printouts into three-dimensional objects, sets them on a stage, photographs them, and then adds and subtracts elements digitally. This piece, from an edition of 10, stems from Gordon’s acclaimed new series, which the New York Times says “may be his best works yet.”

XYLOR JANE
Third Order Magic Square for Deep Sleep (2014)
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A painter with a cult following who was featured in Bob Nickas’s classic book Painting Abstraction, Xylor Jane created exuberantly colored compositions that seem random but are in fact highly regimented systems, governed by numerical structures ranging from the Julian calendar to the mystical Fibonacci sequence. This generously sized signed aquatint, from an edition of 22, is a vibrant example of her deeply encoded work, which has been promoted by some of the art world’s most reliable tastemakers (Jack Hanley and CANADA, to name two galleries) but remains undervalued today.

ANDY WARHOL
Self-Portrait in Drag (1977)
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In the early 1980s, Warhol collaborated with the photographer Christopher Makos on a series of Polaroid photographs of himself in drag, wearing full makeup and exchanging his trademark white wig for a platinum woman’s coiffeur—an echo of Duchamp’s photos as the female Rrose Sélavy (created with Man Ray) and an encapsulation of his own interest in self-invention, theatricality, and the ersatz. Polaroids from this series are in the collection of the Guggenheim and the Getty Museum, and this unique historic work shows the artist denuded of his hairpiece, lipstick still on, gazing into the camera unguardedly, as if it were a mirror.
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